Drying out your home does not kill mold. The absence of moisture only removes the food source, forcing the mold dormant and making it even harder to detect.

(Still drying out? Review part 1 discussing, what is dry ?’ .)

Once completely dry, a good practice is to spray your entire structure with an antimicrobial agent, such as MicrobanAllow time for the antimicrobial to soak into the wood and porous materials of your home, and again go to dry.

An even better practice (and vital to resale value!) is to call in a mold hygienist.  A licensed hygienist can assess your property, including the airspace. If mold spores are detected, the hygienist will write a protocol for remediation. The steps recommended should be executed by a licensed mold remediator. After the protocol is complete, have the original hygienist or another Texas certified mold assessment consultant reevaluate the property.

Even properly dry, this home could have mold.

If licensed in Texas, the hygienist or consultant can then sign a Certificate of Mold Damage Remediation (CMDR) for your home, which is recognized by the Texas Department of Insurance (TDI).

For thorough documentation, you should be able to produce:

  1. Name, license/registration, and a letter stating recommended protocol from the hygienist.
  2. Name, license/registration, and a letter stating services rendered by the remediator.
  3. Name, license, a document of assessment, and CDMR from the final consultant.

With over a 130,000 homes damaged by Harvey, mold professionals will be in high demand. To assist, Texas has suspended the Texas Mold Remediation Rules (TMARR) allowing out-of-state companies to work in disaster areas without a Texas license. These companies are usually licensed in their home states and must register with the TX Department of State Health Services.

The only thing out-of-state companies are not approved to do is sign a CDMR form.

Click to locate TX licensed mold professionals & registered out-of-state professionals